We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Posted May 9, 2018 by Amber in Reviews / 0 Comments

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We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Digital Audiobook narrated by Ariadne Meyers

Published by Listening Library on May 13, 2014
Genres: Contemporary, Fiction, Mystery, Realistic Fiction, Romance, Teen, Young Adult
Length: 227 pages or 6 hours, 27 minutes
Source: Overdrive

GoodreadsAmazonBarnes & NobleBook DepositoryIndieBound

two-stars

We are the Liars.

We are beautiful, privileged and live a life of carefree luxury.

We are cracked and broken.

A story of love and romance.

A tale of tragedy.

Which are lies?

Which is truth?

You decide.


Everybody seems to really enjoy this book, but it sort of made me angry.

I have such limited tolerance for Spoiled Rich Brat Is Sad stories.  Lockhart tries to humanize Cady sometimes – she has chronic migraines and is sad and gives her stuff away.  But she’s so fake and selfish; other characters call her out on her selfishness sometimes, which is a bit satisfying, but it’s not enough for me to like her.  The tragedy in her life is genuinely horrible, but she is so disconnected from it… I couldn’t be bothered to care, either.

Reading this novel, I felt like I was just along for the ride.  There are thrillers that suck you in, get you curious and involved.  We Were Liars didn’t give me that experience at all.  I had the ending figured out in part at 15% of the book.  I had the entire thing figured out by 40%.  So I spent more than half of the book just sitting around waiting to get there.

Beyond all that, though…. this book was just so forgettable.  I think that’s one of the most disappointing tags I can give a book.  You invest your time, your emotions into a novel, and by the time you’ve finished it, you should feel something.  All I felt was “okay, next?”.  The characters were flat.  The author tried to condemn class privilege and racism, but it felt so casual and halfhearted.  Not to say the author didn’t believe in these things, but Cady definitely had no true opinion on them.

Adding on the fact that a lot of the choices the author made weren’t quite explained, just accepted (for example, the way Mirren, Johnny, and Gat were handled just seemed so lazy)… even the fact that the group was called “liars” doesn’t make an awful lot of sense, other than perhaps the author just liked it and it was catchy.  There was nothing fun to be discovered, no grand reveal.  And the interwoven fairy tales?  Not as charming as they must have seemed while writing them.

The book wasn’t horrible or unreadable or anything like that… it was just unimpressive.  I’m glad it was short, because for me it was just on the line of “easy read” and “waste of time”.  As another Goodreads reviewer said, it felt very #whitegirlproblems and #richgirlproblems.

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The Breakdown
Plot
one-star
Characters
one-half-stars
Writing
two-stars
Pacing
three-stars
Setting
three-half-stars
Narrator
four-stars
Personal Enjoyment
one-star
Overall: two-stars
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