The Seeing Stone by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black

Posted June 21, 2018 by Amber in Reviews / 0 Comments

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The Seeing Stone by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black

The Seeing Stone by Holly Black, Tony DiTerlizzi

Digital Audiobook narrated by Mark Hamill

Published by Listening Library, Simon Schuster Books for Young Readers on May 1, 2003
Series: The Spiderwick Chronicles #2
Genres: Children's, Fantasy, Fiction, Middle Grade
Length: 128 pages or 1 hour, 1 minute
Source: Overdrive

GoodreadsAmazonBarnes & NobleBook DepositoryIndieBound

three-half-stars


we said no
still you looked
now instead
someone gets cooked

The Grace kids are just beginning to get used to Aunt Lucinda's strange old mansion when Simon suddenly disappears. Jared and his sister have to rely on the help of a mischievous house boggart, a nasty bridge troll, and a loud-mouthed hobgoblin to get him back.


Goblins have kidnapped Simon and it’s up to his siblings to rescue him.  In this second installment of The Spiderwick Chronicles, we meet the goblins – who have no teeth so they use bits of glass – and a troll who hides under the bridge from the sun.  With the help of a seeing stone they steal from Thimbletack, Jared and Mallory set off through the woods to find Simon.

There’s something missing in translation with the audiobook from the illustrated hardback.  Mark Hamill is a really good narrator, but these books are so short that the illustrations add something to it.  I would listen to any book narrated by Mark Hamill, because he really is an excellent reader, but I think the visual element adds a lot.

The Seeing Stone is a bit if a stronger story than The Field Guide.  The world that Holly and only are slowly building are cute and interesting, which just an edge of darkness.  In this one, we do have roasted pet cat, which bums me out.  I’m never on board for cat-eating, but fortunately, neither is the hobgoblin Hogsqueal.  Still, nothing can save the one they ate….

So major frownie face for eating cats, but otherwise a dark, interesting children’s fairytale.

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The Breakdown
Plot
three-stars
Characters
four-stars
Writing
four-stars
Pacing
two-half-stars
Setting
four-stars
Narrator
five-stars
Personal Enjoyment
two-half-stars
Overall: three-half-stars
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