The Finally Fall Tag

Posted September 21, 2020 by Amber in Bookish Things, Tags / 0 Comments

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Good morning my beautiful monsters! 💜

I have been holding on to this book tag for almost a whole year, ever since Heather @ The Frozen Library tagged me last fall.  I waited to make the tag a little more aesthetically appropriate (I pre-write my posts so far ahead that I was booked into December when she tagged me 😅) but now we’re in beautiful September again and !!! I love fall 🍁.  So excited to be here, y’all.

I did a little digging and was able to track this tag back to being attributed to booktuber Alina Milena.  It looks like they’ve removed everything on their channel, but as a tag creator myself, I like to give credit where credit is due.

In fall, the air is crisp and clear: name a book with a vivid setting!

The Starless Sea

by Erin Morgenstern

The worlds that suck me in the most are Erin Morgenstern’s.  Even though The Starless Sea came out last year, I’m thirsty for more of her exquisite world building.  For those who haven’t read it, this book features hidden lands behind closed doors, museums and college campuses, a lonesome sea of honey, and so many more original, gorgeous details that weave a magical world hidden beneath the ordinary. Her books require a bit of patience and are best for those who like slow, indulgent immersion, but if you’re that kind of person, I can’t recommend this one enough.

Nature is beautiful… but also dying: name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic like loss or grief.

The Astonishing Color of After

by Emily X. R. Pan

The first book that pops to my head for this prompt is The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X. R. Pan.  I’ve actually read a lot of books about grief and loss and there are a lot of really moving ones out there, but Emily’s writing is is effortlessly beautiful.  Well, not effortlessly, I know she went to an incredible amount of work crafting it that way, but it feels effortless when you read it.  This is a sad, sweet book about a teenage girl struggling to find peace with her mother’s suicide and it is in turns sad and hopeful and I honestly can’t recommend it enough.  If you haven’t read this one, it’s #OwnVoices rep, and definitely one to add to the TBR.

Fall is back to school season: share a non-fiction book that taught you something new.

Madame Fourcade’s Secret War

by Lynne Olson

While fiction – especially YA fiction – teaches me how to be a better person with just about every book I read, this feels like a good time to plug some non-fictions because I do occasionally read that as well.  Mostly, I read history, because the story of humanity in all its messiness and failings interests me.  Earlier this year, I listened to the audiobook of Madame Fourcade’s Secret War, which was super interesting.  It’s about Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, a woman who co-headed a French spy network called Alliance during WWII.  She lived a dangerous, fascinating life and her story’s a great one to know, especially if you’re interested in important historical women, underground networks, or WWII.

In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love: name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d like to be a part of.

The L’Eden Crew (+ Hypnos)

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

My favorite found family is the crew from Roshani Chokshi’s Gilded Wolves series.  They are so fractured, but I love them all for different reasons and group scenes, especially from Laila’s POV, really brings to light the “they’re not perfect but they’re family” feeling.  Even at their worst moments, they’re wonderful – great characters as individuals, but even better when they’re working flawlessly together as a team.  It’s those small moments…

…. Anyway, this crew is far and away my favorite found family and I love their type of adventure, so I’d be in to hang out and talk history with Enrique because that’s basically the most I could contribute here. 🤣  And, hey, since we’re here, I’d just like to plug that book two, The Silvered Serpents, comes out tomorrow and it is absolutely wonderful, I’m so excited for everyone to continue on this adventure.

The colorful leaves are piling up on the ground: show us a pile of fall-colored spines!

To prove my devotion, I actually went and pulled a stack of books off my shelves and took a picture.  And now I’m also fairly convinced I could make a pretty book spine rainbow.  Lots of different shades of color!

Not quite bookstagram quality, and I was too lazy to clean off my table and take a proper photograph. BUT.  It’s red and orange and yellow and autumnal and pretty. 😍

Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside: share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.

The Name of the Wind

by Patrick Rothfuss

love this story element and it happens a lot in different types of fantasy.  Sometimes it’s a bard weaving a tale, and sometimes it’s the foundation that the actual content of the book rests within.  In the case of Patrick Rothfuss’ Kingkiller Chronicle, all Kvothe’s adventures are stories-within-a-story, which I always forget about as I’m reading.  It takes a sharp snap into the present and a snarky side-comment from Bast to remind me that Elodin and Denna and everyone are a part of Kvothe’s past and that we’re slowly (eternally) building the bridge between then and now.

The nights are getting darker: share a dark, creepy read.

Frankenstein

by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Lets go for something classic on this one.  Has everyone read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein?  It’s one of those stories that is now part of the cultural consciousness, but it’s dark and disturbing and utterly perfect for a stormy night when the last thing you really want to think about is desecrating graves for body parts to perform an experiment to reanimate a corpse and create a spark of life.  Frankenstein became popular because of its compelling questions on morality and science… but Frankenstein’s monster is the original misunderstood villain.

The days are getting colder: name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day.

Anne of Green Gables

by L. M. Montgomery

I know I use Anne in a lot of book tags.  For this one I tried, I really tried going through my Read list and finding something soft and sweet and heartwarming and… … 🙃 I just, don’t have much of anything?  This is a gap in my reading, I guess.  Not sure if I’m going to fill it with more similar type books, but if I’m being perfectly honest, I’ll probably stick more with the angry, adventurous book style.

Anne of Green Gables, though, is one of my favorite books of all time and it’s a quick read and so sweet and lovely and I recommend it over and over and over again.  If you want a book with little to no stressful drama and that will leave you smiling with every page, Anne Shirley is your girl.

Fall returns every year: name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon.

You know, in a strange twist for me, I’m actually not dying to re-read anything at the moment?  I’m usually all over reading things again and again, and maybe it’s just the gloomy day today as I type this, but I sort of just want to cozy in and discover new things?

I know.  Weird for me.  One of those days maybe? ☔

Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading nights: share your favorite cozy reading “accessories”!

I’m a “snuggle in” sot of reader, so for me, reading accessories are all about what makes me cozy and happy.  Sometimes I’ll light a candle (right now I’m obsessed with Evil Queen, which is not a bookish candle company but I love their sarcastic labels, environmental consciousness, and variety of aromas) but most the time it’s me, a blanket, and a book.

For a while I was getting a decent amount of soft blankets in book boxes, so there’s one from an Alchemy & Ink box I use a lot, as well as the “Don’t Let the Muggles Get You Down” one from a Flick the Wick candle crate.  I was also able to pick up a HUGE minky The Night Circus blanket from Gillywick Goods earlier this year that is a little lighter weight but is cozy and I really like it.

Yeah, even in the summer, I cuddle beneath a blanket to read.  My husband says I’m weird. 🤷‍♀️

Spread the autumn appreciation and tag some people!

Today I’m tagging:

If you’re tagged here, please don’t feel pressured to do the tag… but if you want to, I had a lot of fun filling this one out and I would love to see your answers.  For everyone else, please do feel free to snag this one if you’re an autumnal spirit yourself.  And do check out the tagged blogs, as well as The Frozen Library.  All four have some great and fun content I’m sure you’ll enjoy – I sure do!

The prompts, for easier copy/pasting:

  • In fall, the air is crisp and clear: name a book with a vivid setting!
  • Nature is beautiful… but also dying: name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic like loss or grief.
  • Fall is back to school season: share a non-fiction book that taught you something new.
  • In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love: name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d like to be a part of.
  • The colorful leaves are piling up on the ground: show us a pile of fall-colored spines!
  • Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside: share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.
  • The nights are getting darker: share a dark, creepy read.
  • The days are getting colder: name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day.
  • Fall returns every year: name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon.
  • Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading nights: share your favorite cozy reading “accessories”!
  • Spread the autumn appreciation and tag some people!
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What season do you enjoy best?  Autumn is definitely *my* season, but in regards to weather and aesthetics.  Come tell me about yours in the comments – and definitely let me know if you snag this one, I’d love to read your answers!

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