Source: Audible

Timeless Tales of Beatrix Potter by Beatrix Potter

Timeless Tales of Beatrix Potter by Beatrix Potter

So nobody really talks about it anymore, and I don’t know any friends who have read these tales to their children, but Beatrix Potter is such a classic.  These short tidbits, written over a hundred years ago, are so familiar today.  It was such strange nostalgia going back not just to childhood favorites, but to stories I remember having read to me, and the memory of illustrated collections we used to have. I’m going to try something a bit different here, because this is a collection of very short children’s stories.  So, rather than try to summarize the collection as […]

Posted September 28, 2019 in Reviews // 2 Comments //
The Late Middle Ages by Philip Daileader (The Great Courses)

The Late Middle Ages by Philip Daileader (The Great Courses)

I’m a sucker for The Great Courses because when they’re good, they’re really good.  I absolutely loved the courses on Ancient Egypt and Myths in Human History, and I felt like I learned so much from those professors.  On the other hand, I found the course on The Vikings disappointingly dull.  This… sort of reflects my experience as a history major – some things are fascinating, others are a bit tedious, and it all depends on the professor.  Therefore, my experience with The Great Courses has been hit-or-miss. Unfortunately, I find that The Late Middle Ages was closer to a “miss” for […]

Posted September 22, 2019 in Reviews // 4 Comments //
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games is such a happy re-read for me. I mean, come on.  This book has everything.  A realistically devised dystopian future.  Interesting characters with hidden depths!  There’s so much at stake and the balance of action and romance is just A++ good.  I love this trilogy.  The Hunger Games was the dystopia that pushed YA dystopia into the spotlight, and there’s a prequel coming!  What’s not to love? This marks my fifth time reading this book.  I am the type of reader who may remember the format, but will often forget details as I read.  I feel like every time […]

Posted September 14, 2019 in Reviews // 4 Comments //
Mini Reviews:  Tess of the Road, Daughter of the Burning City, & The Game of Love and Death

Mini Reviews: Tess of the Road, Daughter of the Burning City, & The Game of Love and Death

I know I rarely do mini reviews (read: never) but every once and a while, I do humor myself and re-read a book that I’ve read before.  For posts like these, I don’t think that a unique, standing review is strictly necessary.  After all, I’ve already outlined all the good stuff about these novels.  However, experiences differ between an initial read vs. a reread, and I still want to talk about these books. To solve the repeat-book dilemma, I’ve decided that every time I collect 3 re-reads, I’m going to give y’all a set of mini reviews!  Not as much of a […]

Posted July 30, 2019 in Reviews // 2 Comments //
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice

Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice

Oh Anne Rice.  I have a difficult time understanding why I loved your books so much when I was in high school. Honestly?  Interview with the Vampire is just plain boring.  It is told in interview format, but 95% of the book is just Louis talking.  For as poetic a speaker Louis may be, telling your entire story in dialogue means description is sparse.  And the way Interview With the Vampire is told, it is in first person past tense so everything was reflective.  When something exciting or terrifying was happening to Louis, Lestat, and Claudia… I was just bored.  Because Louis […]

Posted July 27, 2019 in Reviews // 2 Comments //
The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

I’ve read and listened to The Amulet of Samarkand many times since I was first introduced as a high schooler, and so help me, I still love Bartimaeus. This series has a world-feel all it’s own.  It feels like a bit later than Victorian England, but there’s no element of steampunk.  There was a similar aesthetic to Ink and Bone but where that version of the world had fallen apart, this one is tightly held together, like a fine tapestry foretelling doom.  The stiffness of the humans (magician or not) is the contrast needed to make Bartimaeus himself so funny.  Where even young […]

Posted June 29, 2019 in Reviews // 0 Comments //