Source: Borders

The Summoning by Kelley Armstrong

The Summoning by Kelley Armstrong

  I wasn’t sure what I was going to think of this book. Frankly, in YA Fantasy Lit, anything that doesn’t scream “vampire” is a nice respite. So right off the bat, this was a nice break from what is the usual voice in this genre right now. Then enter Chloe, protagonist. I actually liked Chloe, which is strange for me, since I am generally inclined to loathe protagonists (don’t even get me started on Harry Potter…). She’s quirky, but controlled. She’s your typical teenage nerd girl – proud of who she is and dealing with the world in the […]

Posted December 9, 2011 in Reviews // 1 Comment //
School’s Out – Forever by James Patterson

School’s Out – Forever by James Patterson

  Yes, yes, I know. Everybody loves Max. I think that phrase is written across all three of the Patterson books I own. I’m still trying to love Max. I still don’t. The series is not bad. I liked the first book better than I liked School’s Out – Forever. I think that they idea of these kids going to school is a little far-fetched and ridiculous, and as much as the travelling annoyed me before, their goals seemed more realistic to their situation. And I simply couldn’t get past Anne, their caretaker. The lack-of-FBI-esque qualities that abounded in her […]

Posted October 22, 2011 in Reviews // 0 Comments //
The Fool’s Girl by Celia Rees

The Fool’s Girl by Celia Rees

  Although tedious and slightly scattered, The Fool’s Girl is yet another retelling of an old, beloved fairytale… except this one doesn’t trail as far back as Hansel and Gretel or Jack and the Beanstalk – hailing from Elizabethan England, Twelfth Night is comedy, tragedy, drama, and resolution. I found Rees’ style frustrating – there are characters presented as important who ultimately show no purpose at all (I am thinking of Tod, here), and there is a great deal of talk and travel, what I generally refer to as “filler”. It grew tedious. The important plot points felt so few […]

Posted October 11, 2011 in Reviews // 0 Comments //
Feed by M. T. Anderson

Feed by M. T. Anderson

  I simply cannot express how much I love this book. These are the reasons why: It’s a dystopian novel. I have a weak spot for dystopian novels. The characters feel real to me. Not an adult trying to write a teenager. I never doubt Titus as a character, never second-guess his motives. Perfectly crafted. The language. This is a pitfall for many people, but for me, it just ropes me in closer to the story. The questions it asks about technology and our dependence on it. And on instant gratification. I can see where this novel would be immediately […]

Posted September 6, 2011 in Reviews // 0 Comments //
Terrier by Tamora Pierce

Terrier by Tamora Pierce

  I liked Beka’s story because it was one of Pierce’s, but that was about the extent of my interest. I found some places to be tedious, as though it took Beka a very long time to find one little piece of information, but she discovered the whole plot in a moment. I understand that Pierce is working towards a trilogy, and so the things that bore me now are likely to be important later. This book is written in the first person, and that must be expected before going into it. Traditionally Pierce writes in the third person, so […]

Posted September 3, 2011 in Reviews // 0 Comments //
Wake by Lisa McMann

Wake by Lisa McMann

  Wake was refreshing as a short book, but even then on some counts it failed to deliver. The characters remained rather flat and a little stereotyped, and really, how many of us are taking Cabel’s sudden and magical transformation very seriously? But if you can get past the stories, McMann’s got a very interesting concept. And Janie’s best friend Carrie? She’s the worst. Getting past the intellectually shallow characters, McMann does have a very interesting concept. There are not a lot of books that delve into the dream world, and even fewer that do so without tying themselves to […]

Posted August 26, 2011 in Reviews // 0 Comments //